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How to Argue with a Cat: A Human's Guide to the Art of Persuasion

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If you can persuade a cat ... you can persuade anyone. This is the essential guide to getting your way. Jay Heinrichs, award-winning author of Thank You for Arguing and advisor to the Pentagon, NASA and Fortune 500 companies, distils a lifetime of negotiating and rhetoric to show you how to win over anyone - from colleagues and bosses, to friends and partners at home (and If you can persuade a cat ... you can persuade anyone. This is the essential guide to getting your way. Jay Heinrichs, award-winning author of Thank You for Arguing and advisor to the Pentagon, NASA and Fortune 500 companies, distils a lifetime of negotiating and rhetoric to show you how to win over anyone - from colleagues and bosses, to friends and partners at home (and even the most stubborn of feline adversaries). You'll learn to: Perfect your timing - learn exactly when to pounce Get your body language, tone and gesture just right Think about what your opponent wants - always offer a comfy lap Lure them in by making them think they have the power The result? A happy, hopefully scratch-free, resolution. 'Jay Heinrichs knows a thing or two about arguing' The Times 'A master rhetorician and persuasion guru' Salon 'You got a bunch of logical engineers to inject pathos into their arguments ... it works!' NASA engineer


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If you can persuade a cat ... you can persuade anyone. This is the essential guide to getting your way. Jay Heinrichs, award-winning author of Thank You for Arguing and advisor to the Pentagon, NASA and Fortune 500 companies, distils a lifetime of negotiating and rhetoric to show you how to win over anyone - from colleagues and bosses, to friends and partners at home (and If you can persuade a cat ... you can persuade anyone. This is the essential guide to getting your way. Jay Heinrichs, award-winning author of Thank You for Arguing and advisor to the Pentagon, NASA and Fortune 500 companies, distils a lifetime of negotiating and rhetoric to show you how to win over anyone - from colleagues and bosses, to friends and partners at home (and even the most stubborn of feline adversaries). You'll learn to: Perfect your timing - learn exactly when to pounce Get your body language, tone and gesture just right Think about what your opponent wants - always offer a comfy lap Lure them in by making them think they have the power The result? A happy, hopefully scratch-free, resolution. 'Jay Heinrichs knows a thing or two about arguing' The Times 'A master rhetorician and persuasion guru' Salon 'You got a bunch of logical engineers to inject pathos into their arguments ... it works!' NASA engineer

30 review for How to Argue with a Cat: A Human's Guide to the Art of Persuasion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Carin

    We have two cats, Doozy and Turkey. They are both extremely persuasive in their own ways. Turkey has learned that even though he is almost six, if he makes a tiny kitten meow, he's more likely to get what he wants. Doozy will actually put a paw out towards a food we have that she wants, as if to help direct us. And if you have a cat or six, you'll know what I mean. Do you feed the cats on your schedule, or on their schedule? Do you pet them (and more importantly, stop petting them) when you want We have two cats, Doozy and Turkey. They are both extremely persuasive in their own ways. Turkey has learned that even though he is almost six, if he makes a tiny kitten meow, he's more likely to get what he wants. Doozy will actually put a paw out towards a food we have that she wants, as if to help direct us. And if you have a cat or six, you'll know what I mean. Do you feed the cats on your schedule, or on their schedule? Do you pet them (and more importantly, stop petting them) when you want to, or when they want you to? Have you ever stopped doing work in order to throw a ball or a mouse or shake a feathery thing? Did you really think, I want to take a break from work right now, or did your cat bring you that mouse and drop it at your feet? Not only are cats very persuasive, but they are very difficult to persuade. I have been unable to persuade Turkey to stop eating our clothes, so all closets must be kept tightly closed. When I need to lock him in my office for a while, such as when the exterminator was here spraying for ants, he will not be persuaded to relax and chill and hang out. Instead he will spend four hours staring at the door pensively. If you can persuade a cat to do things, you can persuade anyone. And who better to learn lessons of persuasion from, then your cat? Does he ever argue you into submission? Considering his lack of human language, I'll bet that's a big no. And yet, when I'm cleaning up the grass he has vomited on the carpet after he convinced me for the umpteenth time to let him go out in the yard and eat grass, and somehow he told me, don't worry, this time I won't throw up. I know he's the master of this skill and I am not. Mr. Heinrichs has written a serious, successful book about the art of persuasion. And here he has taken the same subject, and run with the metaphor, to make for a very accessible, highly entertaining book about silly cats and their ridiculous way (paired with hilarious drawings) which will in the end teach you how to be a more persuasive human, even if your cat will still always win arguments. But maybe now you can at least convince other humans to do what you want. Even if you can never convince cats.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    I am of two minds about this book. On the one hand it was very accessible to me, as I am owned by a cat and know his ways well. A lot of the examples were recognizable and gave me a good chuckle or resulted in an acknowledging nod. Humans then become much easier to understand. The subject of argument and persuasion also benefit from a good helping of humour to keep a possibly dry subject light. But on the other hand the book was very short and fast paced and with the subject being so new to me I I am of two minds about this book. On the one hand it was very accessible to me, as I am owned by a cat and know his ways well. A lot of the examples were recognizable and gave me a good chuckle or resulted in an acknowledging nod. Humans then become much easier to understand. The subject of argument and persuasion also benefit from a good helping of humour to keep a possibly dry subject light. But on the other hand the book was very short and fast paced and with the subject being so new to me I feel it will need another read in future when I am more familiar with the topics to fully appreciate it. For now I'll be exploring other books on the subject, by this or another author, to gain a deeper understanding. I'm open to recommendations in the comments.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annija Tesloviča

    The most funny self-help book I ever read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    4.5 I feel like it's hard to rate an advice book because its all about how the book worked for you and how you could apply the advice given. Personally, I rather enjoyed this book because the advice was given in a fun way where it related everything to cats. I don't even like cats that much, but it was a good way for the author to use examples that I could visualize well and understand in a better way then just using humans. I think this is a great book on learning how to do persuasive writing, o 4.5 I feel like it's hard to rate an advice book because its all about how the book worked for you and how you could apply the advice given. Personally, I rather enjoyed this book because the advice was given in a fun way where it related everything to cats. I don't even like cats that much, but it was a good way for the author to use examples that I could visualize well and understand in a better way then just using humans. I think this is a great book on learning how to do persuasive writing, or any kind of argument, and the different methods involved.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Czol

    Interesting way of presenting the topic, but even with the short length it dragged things out way longer than necessary. Would have been better suited to a blog post.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ventseslav Yordanov

    I gave it 2 stars, because of the tips that must be kept in mind and are obnoxiously given in the book. I generally didn't like the book. I gave it 2 stars, because of the tips that must be kept in mind and are obnoxiously given in the book. I generally didn't like the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Ray

    Clearly there are those who love this book. I felt it was a mess -- though perhaps I would've been better off with Thank You For Arguing, Heinrichs' other book, intended to be more educational. How to Argue with a Cat is aiming to be the humorous introduction to the topic. The cat talk comes thick and fast. Even as a cat person, it was too much. I felt it often got in the way of the point, as the metaphors would get muddled and every paragraph of info had to be accompanied with another paragraph Clearly there are those who love this book. I felt it was a mess -- though perhaps I would've been better off with Thank You For Arguing, Heinrichs' other book, intended to be more educational. How to Argue with a Cat is aiming to be the humorous introduction to the topic. The cat talk comes thick and fast. Even as a cat person, it was too much. I felt it often got in the way of the point, as the metaphors would get muddled and every paragraph of info had to be accompanied with another paragraph of "And the way a CAT would do it is..." Eventually I just started skipping the cat parts, and there's some good info in places, but it feels like an incomplete, distracted primer on persuasion. The book also confuses reference for humour (much like Ready Player One). Writing a joke about cats isn't the same as simply mentioning a cat thing. Most of this book is the latter. If you're SO into cats that inexhaustible mentions of scratchies and yarn balls floats your boat, maybe you'll be right at home here. I haven't checked out Thank You For Arguing yet, but I'm betting that's the better option.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ananannana

    Learnt more about cats and political correctness than anything else. The book doesnt get to the point, and you're still left asking "ok... but how?". It basically defines and explains what persuading and negotiations is... then goes on to being even more descriptive, to then underline statements that are kind off common sense like "care about what your partner is saying" or "act confident" as mind-blowing tips. All in all, very similar to other How to books that never really reach a strong point Learnt more about cats and political correctness than anything else. The book doesnt get to the point, and you're still left asking "ok... but how?". It basically defines and explains what persuading and negotiations is... then goes on to being even more descriptive, to then underline statements that are kind off common sense like "care about what your partner is saying" or "act confident" as mind-blowing tips. All in all, very similar to other How to books that never really reach a strong point. Really liked the cat drawings though.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeanne

    It's really about 3.5 but I decided to round up because he quotes one of my favorite authors, Bob Tarte. It's a slim book with tips on arguing-- but I prefer his definition of arguing, which is NOT fighting. It's persuading someone else to come to your point of view and doing so with logic and understanding, not bullying. Sadly, logic seems in short supply of late. The conceit of arguing with a cat is a clever one and makes it all go down in an entertaining way. It's really about 3.5 but I decided to round up because he quotes one of my favorite authors, Bob Tarte. It's a slim book with tips on arguing-- but I prefer his definition of arguing, which is NOT fighting. It's persuading someone else to come to your point of view and doing so with logic and understanding, not bullying. Sadly, logic seems in short supply of late. The conceit of arguing with a cat is a clever one and makes it all go down in an entertaining way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Vlasenko

    This book is perfect for cat-lovers. Me being a cat lady appreciated the author speaking “my language” & explaining simple but effective persuasion techniques. The book is a short one and can be easily digested on a short distance flight :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Lots of fun to read and excellent lessons. If my husband and son weren’t so allergic, it also would have convinced me to adopt a cat.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Haraldohoo

    a fun and brisk introduction to understanding rhetoric and the art of arguing your case well, how to argue from your interlocutor's point of view, that good argument is not a zero sum game (mostly). Using amusing experiences with cats to show how rhetoric works on even the most difficult of opponents. "Anyone who believes what a cat tells them deserves all he gets"-Neil Gaiman. For a deeper and broader treatment of argument that is also entertaining and educational, go to Jay Heinrich's New York a fun and brisk introduction to understanding rhetoric and the art of arguing your case well, how to argue from your interlocutor's point of view, that good argument is not a zero sum game (mostly). Using amusing experiences with cats to show how rhetoric works on even the most difficult of opponents. "Anyone who believes what a cat tells them deserves all he gets"-Neil Gaiman. For a deeper and broader treatment of argument that is also entertaining and educational, go to Jay Heinrich's New York Times Best Seller "Thank you for arguing" with examples from Aristotle, American presidents and Homer Simpson.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tess

    10/10 would recommend this mindless quarantine read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Greenway

    Fun, witty. Some good points about persuasion.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ella

    Interesting. I love cats, I like self-help books. Potentially some learnings and fun comparisons between cats and people. Only thing I was asking myself throughout the book: “Why did this get published?” or better yet: “Why am I reading it?” *Reading all the books I already own (8/16)*

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Grundy

    I didn't think this book was bad at all it just wasn't my subject. I read it because it was given to me and I enjoyed reading it but I wouldn't have picked it out myself as I am not concerned with arguing. But much like the book talks about persuasion, I was persuaded to read it with the promise of chat about cats and so I wasn't disappointed. I think if you are interested in rhetoric and cats then you will love this book. I didn't think this book was bad at all it just wasn't my subject. I read it because it was given to me and I enjoyed reading it but I wouldn't have picked it out myself as I am not concerned with arguing. But much like the book talks about persuasion, I was persuaded to read it with the promise of chat about cats and so I wasn't disappointed. I think if you are interested in rhetoric and cats then you will love this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Baer

    Since I believe that cats are evil, I may not have been the best candidate for reading this book. I selected it because another Goodreads member whose books I happened to peruse had rated it highly. I read it in two sittings; in the first, I was exasperated by the cat shtick. In the second and final reading session, I was in a better mood to adapt to the fact that every single piece of straightforward good advice was expressed in the form of advice relevant for cats. Reading around the “cat this, Since I believe that cats are evil, I may not have been the best candidate for reading this book. I selected it because another Goodreads member whose books I happened to peruse had rated it highly. I read it in two sittings; in the first, I was exasperated by the cat shtick. In the second and final reading session, I was in a better mood to adapt to the fact that every single piece of straightforward good advice was expressed in the form of advice relevant for cats. Reading around the “cat this, cat that” gimmick, there were good, usable pieces of advice in the book. On page 94, for instance, we find the advice to “tuck in your tail” – which means, maintain an erect posture with your head floating like a relaxed balloon directly over your shoulders. “Keep that spine away from the back of the chair – it’s a posture killer. To keep from looking stiff in this pose, relax your shoulders straight down – not forward, but down. Good. You’re sitting like a cat. … People will see you as a confident person, and may even ask you if you’ve been working out.” Similarly, when you are speaking (even while sitting), imagine a heavy weight hanging down between your legs: try to keep it from swinging. You do this by avoiding a shifting of weight from leg to leg… Your mom always told you not to fidget or squirm, and she was right – it distracts the listener.” He quotes Heinlein, which is endearing to me: “Never try to outstubborn a cat.” The persuasion checklist (sigh, ok, the “Cat Persuasion Checklist”):What is your goal? – check if the relationship is more important than winning the argument. Is it a good time? – best time to persuade is when the other wants something, food for instance. What mood is your audience in? – if bad, try to do something to change it to a good mood. Is he paying attention? – you must entertain. What tense are you using? – try switching to a future tense if you are trying to persuade action. Are you loving your audience, or pretending to? – if you pretend to enjoy their company, you may actually do so. They will like you more. Does he like and trust you? – Ethos is the image your cat has of you. Does your argument make sense to your audience? - Focus on what your audience believes and expects. Your audience will not mind if you pretend the red laser dot is an alien space bug that must be killed. Is your posture good? – see above. Do you look confident? – faking confidence can make it real. Have you broken the action into chunks? – ask your audience for one little thing, then another, leading to the big action: ramping. Having come close to dnf’ing it, I ended up liking it. I would recommend it to anyone preparing for job interviews because it provides good advice without taking up too much of your time. But, Cats.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Cats 1, Me 0, Until Now — Maybe Review HOW TO ARGUE WITH A CAT by Jay Heinrichs http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... 
 I have four monsters monkeys cats so, when I saw that Penguin Random House audio was offering a book about arguing with, as in convincing, cats I was intrigued. As a woman with four cats how could I possibly pass this one up – especially as my oldest, most venerated cat is so very argumentative. I don’t always thoroughly read the description of a book so I thought this would be a Cats 1, Me 0, Until Now — Maybe Review HOW TO ARGUE WITH A CAT by Jay Heinrichs http://fangswandsandfairydust.com/201... 
 I have four monsters monkeys cats so, when I saw that Penguin Random House audio was offering a book about arguing with, as in convincing, cats I was intrigued. As a woman with four cats how could I possibly pass this one up – especially as my oldest, most venerated cat is so very argumentative. I don’t always thoroughly read the description of a book so I thought this would be a manual to teach me how to persuade my little evil critters to not howl in the car, or just because they feel like it. It’s also interesting that Jay Henrich talks a lot about Rhetoric and my degrees are in Rhetoric and Communication. He uses terms like “enthymeme,” possibly the least used word in the English language, and one of my favorite words. It is an argument in which one premise of an argument is not explicitly stated. That allows the reader, or your boss to draw the conclusion on his/her own. When humans do this, it can convince the person to think it is true. More than a manual to help us convince cats, Heinrich offers a treatment of argument with cats as exemplars of persuasion. It’s a bit of an “Everything I Know about Arguing I Learned from My Cat” approach. He does offer a couple of strategies for getting a cat to behave as you want her/him too. He does a great job explaining some aspects of cat behavior – especially about jumping on the table and play-hunting. But those are secondary. It’s a bit of a device in teaching argumentation – and he is a powerhouse of the theory and practice thereof. He explains it all really well. I learned some practical strategies to help me help people to negotiate with me (so I can convince them to do what I know is right). Heinrich does a lovely job narrating the book. He obviously has a history in public speaking and as the writer knows where he wants the inflections and emphasis. My only problem is that the cats also heard the book and now they will be wise to my tricks. It is a device, but these skill-teaching books often use devices as a way of reaching people. If it works to teach them who cares. I laughed frequently but think the book offers serious skills using humor. Now, if I could just get the cats into the damn car.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Kollars

    I was looking for a primer on "rhetoric". This book is indeed a rhetoric primer, a short, _extremely simple, _extremely cutesy one. So much so that I was unable to list what exactly it was that I'd learned and what I hadn't. The cutesy premise, behind both the title and the text, is that if you can successfully argue with a cat, then you needn't even give a thought to humans because they're so much easier. Some bits of Greek terminology are thrown in. For all I know the definitions and examples I was looking for a primer on "rhetoric". This book is indeed a rhetoric primer, a short, _extremely simple, _extremely cutesy one. So much so that I was unable to list what exactly it was that I'd learned and what I hadn't. The cutesy premise, behind both the title and the text, is that if you can successfully argue with a cat, then you needn't even give a thought to humans because they're so much easier. Some bits of Greek terminology are thrown in. For all I know the definitions and examples are perfectly correct. What was missing for me is why I should _care about this extremely old and rather awkward terminology. Is it still used so commonly that it will be hard to understand other books without some acquaintance with this lingo? Does it give a feeling for just how very old some of these ideas are? Does it illustrate some kind of continuity from ancient Greek rhetoric to rhetoric nowadays? Does using it correctly provide a degree of sophistication without which it will be hard to get mos rhetoric instructors to take me seriously? ...? The main takeaway I got from the book is that where the goal is to "persuade" someone, logic and argument are useless (or worse:-) and everything depends instead on making the other guy feel good about doing what you want him to do. I expected this theme to be backed up with some kind of science (psychiatry? neurology? evolution?), but instead it's backed up with simply anecdotes about very familiar cat behaviors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hankins

    I enjoyed this book as I am currently enrolled within a 620 course in argumentation reading Plato and Aristotle. The book comes to me while I am immersed in those deeper readings on the subject of rhetoric. I can see and appreciate how Heinricks is able to draw similarities by creating the disparities between humans and cats. As I was thinking about who the reader for this book might be, I thought about the students in my room for whom the subjects presented in HOW TO ARGUE WITH A CAT are brand I enjoyed this book as I am currently enrolled within a 620 course in argumentation reading Plato and Aristotle. The book comes to me while I am immersed in those deeper readings on the subject of rhetoric. I can see and appreciate how Heinricks is able to draw similarities by creating the disparities between humans and cats. As I was thinking about who the reader for this book might be, I thought about the students in my room for whom the subjects presented in HOW TO ARGUE WITH A CAT are brand new. One way to book talk and place this book might be to ask the room, "Who has a cat?" When the person asking the question observes the reader in the room frantically waving their hand in the air to talk about THEIR cat and how it is the best cat. . .this is your reader who would benefit from reading this book alongside of the academic reading required for the course. The book could serve as a good primer for civil discourse: how to enter into it; how to recognize why it sometimes feels the way it does; and what we present within the conversation that furthers or stymies it. Anyone who has read and appreciated Aristotle's THE ART OF RHETORIC will see what Heinrichs is doing by way of overview. What makes the book fun is that much of this is wasted on the cat. And this is why we love them. And bring them "Good Things."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christofer Beaudry

    In an obvious effort to avoid the one extreme of academic jargon, Jay Heinrichs in "How to Argue with a Cat" has strolled past simplicity and entered into the opposite extreme of being so simplistic that one needs a fair amount of knowledge and competence in Rhetoric for this work to be actually useful. Heinrich uses the repeated example of getting a cat (who are notoriously stubborn and independent) to do as he wants as the medium through which he gives some advice on the art of persuasion. To In an obvious effort to avoid the one extreme of academic jargon, Jay Heinrichs in "How to Argue with a Cat" has strolled past simplicity and entered into the opposite extreme of being so simplistic that one needs a fair amount of knowledge and competence in Rhetoric for this work to be actually useful. Heinrich uses the repeated example of getting a cat (who are notoriously stubborn and independent) to do as he wants as the medium through which he gives some advice on the art of persuasion. To the uninitiated, as I was when I first read it, this book can seem confusing, unrealistic, silly, and perhaps even condescending. I would recommend looking elsewhere if interested in arguing, debating, or Rhetoric. One great place to start would be Heinrichs's "Thank You for Arguing" which is excellent. For anyone well-versed, or at least familiar with argumentation literature, this book can be a useful tool for understanding some key concepts through a new perspective, reading a breif and funny refresher on some known concepts, and even learning a few new things. All things considered: 2 stars, would not recommend as a persuasion book for beginners as seems to have been intended.

  22. 5 out of 5

    John Pabon

    Review #33 of my 52 week book challenge: How to Argue With a Cat. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I've often equated policy with trying to herd cats. No matter how many you have going in the right direction, there's always one that wants to do its own thing. Had I known about this book, maybe my life at the UN wouldn't have been so difficult!⁣ ⁣ Jay Heinrichs sets out to explain how cats, the most obstinant animal in all of creation, can actually serve as a model for getting humans across the line. From dealing with holding Review #33 of my 52 week book challenge: How to Argue With a Cat. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I've often equated policy with trying to herd cats. No matter how many you have going in the right direction, there's always one that wants to do its own thing. Had I known about this book, maybe my life at the UN wouldn't have been so difficult!⁣ ⁣ Jay Heinrichs sets out to explain how cats, the most obstinant animal in all of creation, can actually serve as a model for getting humans across the line. From dealing with holding an intelligent conversation, keeping your decorum and composure, as well as blazing a trail anyone would want to follow, this guidebook is even more appropriate in these trying times. ⁣ ⁣⁣ To find out why I started my 52 week book challenge, what I've been reading, and how you can get involved, check out my original LinkedIn Publisher article or follow me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charley Robson

    It's nothing you didn't know before, and nothing you probably aren't already doing, but if you need a refresher on good conduct in life, work and general being, you might as well do it with cats. The best parts are the sketches with the small snippet-quote summations; they're the punchiest, and therefore the most memorable, part of the overall product. The rest is relatively short, with nice little bite-sized segments you can pick out and read as and when you need them, rather than being forced t It's nothing you didn't know before, and nothing you probably aren't already doing, but if you need a refresher on good conduct in life, work and general being, you might as well do it with cats. The best parts are the sketches with the small snippet-quote summations; they're the punchiest, and therefore the most memorable, part of the overall product. The rest is relatively short, with nice little bite-sized segments you can pick out and read as and when you need them, rather than being forced through the whole thing like an overstuffed 'self-help' biography-cum-product-pusher. This is the good sort of self help book. Give it a go.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nayeli

    I picked up this book on a whim, basically I found it at the book store and it was related to cats so I bought it. It's a very simple read, and it's written in lessons. However, I'm not sure someone who doesn't own a cat will enjoy it, as the examples are very specific, and sometimes far-fetched (this make the reading tedious at times). It's more of a comedy book and hardly a thorough guide, as I'm sure you can tell by the title and cover. Oh and another thing! since I started teaching high scho I picked up this book on a whim, basically I found it at the book store and it was related to cats so I bought it. It's a very simple read, and it's written in lessons. However, I'm not sure someone who doesn't own a cat will enjoy it, as the examples are very specific, and sometimes far-fetched (this make the reading tedious at times). It's more of a comedy book and hardly a thorough guide, as I'm sure you can tell by the title and cover. Oh and another thing! since I started teaching high school I realized teenagers are a lot like cats so... if you have a teenager in your life definitely give it a read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zahida Zahoor

    The book highlights some basic persuasion tips. Firstly, to consider what are your goals are for persuading and then to decide how you are going to go about it. Important points to bear in mind are your timing, your opponent’s mood, their attention level, do they like you or trust you, what is your argument and does it make sense. Then to consider your own body language: do you look confident and is your posture correct. In order to get the desired action have you broken up the action into manag The book highlights some basic persuasion tips. Firstly, to consider what are your goals are for persuading and then to decide how you are going to go about it. Important points to bear in mind are your timing, your opponent’s mood, their attention level, do they like you or trust you, what is your argument and does it make sense. Then to consider your own body language: do you look confident and is your posture correct. In order to get the desired action have you broken up the action into manageable chunks. The author makes some interesting parallels with cats, implying that the art of persuasion is primitive that can be homed in on.

  26. 4 out of 5

    E A

    Mixed feelings I have started this book with enthusiasm, for I like books on how to make good arguments and thought cats element would be something I could relate to. Many times I was disappointed at what I was reading, finding the examples too simple or not realistic at all. I enjoyed some parts, when different fallacies are introduced, but then the examples were not clear enough: I need to revert to other sources to clarify ‘post hoc fallacy’ and ‘fallacy of the antecedent’. Overall, not a disa Mixed feelings I have started this book with enthusiasm, for I like books on how to make good arguments and thought cats element would be something I could relate to. Many times I was disappointed at what I was reading, finding the examples too simple or not realistic at all. I enjoyed some parts, when different fallacies are introduced, but then the examples were not clear enough: I need to revert to other sources to clarify ‘post hoc fallacy’ and ‘fallacy of the antecedent’. Overall, not a disaster, but on the other hand, cannot go beyond average satisfaction.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Suleiman Arabiat

    An entertaining quick read, mostly for its cat analogies than for the actual conclusions or tactics mentioned. The author doesn't promise much in the introduction, and proceeds to picking on various topics on how to argue, diffuse tension, achieve your interpersonal goals, and transform some of your behavior, all with a clear comparative analogy to cats. The humor is nice most of the time, and the advice and tips put forward are useful yet not very thorough (while some can be easily refuted as use An entertaining quick read, mostly for its cat analogies than for the actual conclusions or tactics mentioned. The author doesn't promise much in the introduction, and proceeds to picking on various topics on how to argue, diffuse tension, achieve your interpersonal goals, and transform some of your behavior, all with a clear comparative analogy to cats. The humor is nice most of the time, and the advice and tips put forward are useful yet not very thorough (while some can be easily refuted as useless as well). Nice read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patti Hinko

    Pros: I honestly picked up this book because of the title and I wanted something light hearted to listen and short to listen to while cleaning. This did the job. I was an amused by Heinrichs' analogies and appreciated his easy to follow explanations. Cons: Nothing really. This book was exactly what I expected it to be. It wasn't groundbreaking or phenomenal; it was mildly entertaining and informative, but just didn't have the "wow" factor Would I Recommend: Eh. If you want something quick and amus Pros: I honestly picked up this book because of the title and I wanted something light hearted to listen and short to listen to while cleaning. This did the job. I was an amused by Heinrichs' analogies and appreciated his easy to follow explanations. Cons: Nothing really. This book was exactly what I expected it to be. It wasn't groundbreaking or phenomenal; it was mildly entertaining and informative, but just didn't have the "wow" factor Would I Recommend: Eh. If you want something quick and amusing, sure. No need to go out and buy it though.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    The author introduces us to cats as the masters of persuasion and arguing and teaches us how to argue using cats as an example. For example, the importance of body language, posture, gestures, and tone of voice when communicating, or even how cats often will not come without a reason just like people so meetings should have an agenda and cats may need to be given food. As a cat owner of four cats I found this book to be very amusing and could picture my cats in the examples used which made me la The author introduces us to cats as the masters of persuasion and arguing and teaches us how to argue using cats as an example. For example, the importance of body language, posture, gestures, and tone of voice when communicating, or even how cats often will not come without a reason just like people so meetings should have an agenda and cats may need to be given food. As a cat owner of four cats I found this book to be very amusing and could picture my cats in the examples used which made me laugh. It was a light enjoyable read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    My favorite line from the book, "Persuasion is a dark art. If you want to make it less dark, shine a light on it." I love the cat metaphor for persuasion. It reminds me of some very good cat arguments, such as those conducted by Mayor Stubbs, the late cat mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska. This is a good introduction to the art of persuasion that is given more depth in Jay's other book, Thank you for arguing. I can hardly wait to use this one with my ninth grade English students. My favorite line from the book, "Persuasion is a dark art. If you want to make it less dark, shine a light on it." I love the cat metaphor for persuasion. It reminds me of some very good cat arguments, such as those conducted by Mayor Stubbs, the late cat mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska. This is a good introduction to the art of persuasion that is given more depth in Jay's other book, Thank you for arguing. I can hardly wait to use this one with my ninth grade English students.

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